Noumenology

Media Studies and stuff

thescienceofreality:

The Clock of Long Now and the Next 10,000 Years.


“There is a Clock ringing deep inside a mountain. It is a huge Clock, hundreds of feet tall, designed to tick for 10,000 years. Every once in a while the bells of this buried Clock play a melody. Each time the chimes ring, it’s a melody the Clock has never played before. The Clock’s chimes have been programmed to not repeat themselves for 10,000 years. Most times the Clock rings when a visitor has wound it, but the Clock hoards energy from a different source and occasionally it will ring itself when no one is around to hear it. It’s anyone’s guess how many beautiful songs will never be heard over the Clock’s 10 millennial lifespan.

The Clock is real. It is now being built inside a mountain in western Texas. This Clock is the first of many millennial Clocks the designers hope will be built around the world and throughout time. There is a second site for another Clock already purchased at the top of a mountain in eastern Nevada, a site surrounded by a very large grove of 5,000-year-old bristlecone pines. Appropriately, bristlecone pines are among the longest-lived organisms on the planet. The designers of the Clock in Texas expect its chimes will keep ringing twice as long as the oldest 5 millennia-old bristlecone pine. Ten thousand years is about the age of civilization, so a 10K-year Clock would measure out a future of civilization equal to its past. That assumes we are in the middle of whatever journey we are on – an implicit statement of optimism.” [x]


So what’s the point? Who would do this?

Read More

(via imall4frogs)

(Source: gifs-from-movies)

(Source: thefreshpegg)

jalopnikupdates:

This Amazing Time Lapse Video Shows Sandy’s Assault On New York And The Moment The Lights Went Out

A camera on top of 2 Northside Piers shows New York before Sandy rolled in, its destructive approach, and the sudden loss of power as the storm surge flooded lower Manhattan.

This is the best angle and the longest exposure we’ve yet seen of Sandy’s full impact. The video was created by Silas Maniatis.

Hat tip to Luke Taylor

(via gawkercom)

kurutta:

Airplane!, 1980.

kurutta:

Airplane!, 1980.

explore-blog:

So clever – the human body visualized as a subway map by designer Sam Loman, a fine addition to these visual metaphors using he London Tube map.
Also see these vintage illustrations envisioning the body as a machine.

explore-blog:

So clever – the human body visualized as a subway map by designer Sam Loman, a fine addition to these visual metaphors using he London Tube map.

Also see these vintage illustrations envisioning the body as a machine.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

explore-blog:

The Noun Project, one of 3 noteworthy open-source graphic design projects, is building a global visual language of royalty-free symbols, a kind of ISOTYPE for the digital age.

Bonus points for the video voiceover by Roman Mars of 99% Invisible fame.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

unconsumption:


Rebaroque’s Mikal Hameed and Rebecca Paul bring us soundscapes by way of vintage picture frames with speakers embedded into a canvas of sophisticated fabric. The speakers are designed to be connected to computers and portable music players or used as a dock. A great three-way between visual and aural art and sustainability.

(via Up-Cycled Sound Frames by Rebaroque)

unconsumption:

Rebaroque’s Mikal Hameed and Rebecca Paul bring us soundscapes by way of vintage picture frames with speakers embedded into a canvas of sophisticated fabric. The speakers are designed to be connected to computers and portable music players or used as a dock. A great three-way between visual and aural art and sustainability.

(via Up-Cycled Sound Frames by Rebaroque)

apoplecticskeptic:

markcoatney:

sunfoundation:

Actually, 70% of the country would benefit more under Obama’s plan. See how you would fare.

The fall-out commentary over Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” comment has been fascinating for a number of reasons, but perhaps most of all because it has raised good questions of who actually pays for government and who benefits.

For those who want to dig deeper into these questions, there is a great new website that estimates the actual impacts of the Romney and Obama tax plans: Politify.

Based on Politify’s calculations, 69.8% of Americans would financially benefit more from the Obama plan, as compared to 30.2% under the Romney plan.

Where this really hits home is when you put in numbers for families. At the U.S. median income levels, the Obama plan gives a family of four a few thousand/year more than the Romney plan. At a $1 million annual salary, the Romney plan gives that same family of four $90,000 more than Obama. 

That is some remarkable tech right there.

(via imall4frogs)